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Are you considering upgrading your home with a touch of opulence? Luxury wood flooring might be exactly what you're looking for. This type of flooring offers an unparalleled blend of style, durability, and warmth that can transform any space. But it's not just about aesthetics; it's also an investment.

So, before you dive headfirst into a new flooring project, it's important to understand what distinguishes luxury wood flooring from its counterparts.

In this article, we'll lift the lid on the world of luxury wood flooring, discussing different types, costs, maintenance techniques, and comparisons with budget alternatives. By the end, you'll be equipped with valuable insights that can help you make an informed decision for your home.

What Is Luxury Wood Flooring?

Luxury wood flooring isn't your everyday, run-off-the-mill flooring option. It's much more than that. This is a superior category of flooring that uses high-quality, often exotic, wood species to deliver an exquisite aesthetic appeal.

Luxury wood flooring is distinguished by its craftsmanship. Each plank is carefully chosen, sanded, and treated to ensure only the finest quality. 

The result? A stunning floor that exudes elegance and sophistication, adding a lavish feel to any room. 

An added bonus? High-end wood flooring can significantly increase the value of your property.

What Are the Different Types of Luxury Wood Flooring?

Luxury wood flooring comes in a variety of forms, each offering its unique touch of elegance and style. Let's dive into the characteristics, advantages, and potential drawbacks of three popular types of luxury wood flooring: Hardwood, Engineered Hardwood, and Parquet.

Hardwood Flooring

When it comes to luxury wood flooring, hardwood is typically the first that springs to mind. Crafted from a single piece of timber, hardwood flooring is sourced from tall, strong trees such as oak, maple, and walnut. The appeal of this type of flooring lies in its sheer natural beauty and durability.

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Engineered Hardwood Flooring

Engineered hardwood is a more contemporary variant of luxury wood flooring. It's composed of multiple layers of wood, usually plywood, with a genuine hardwood veneer on top. This unique construction offers some advantages over traditional hardwood.

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Parquet Flooring

Parquet flooring is a unique and artistic variant of wood flooring. It involves the careful arrangement of small wood pieces into geometric patterns, resulting in a beautiful mosaic effect that can elevate a room's appearance.

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What Type of Wood Is Luxury Wood Flooring?

The term ‘luxury' in wood flooring encompasses a range of top-tier wood types, each boasting its unique appearance and characteristics. Let's delve into three popular wood types used in luxury wood flooring: Ash, Walnut, and Bamboo.

Ash

Ashwood is a prominent choice in the luxury flooring sector. It's known for its light colour, ranging from yellow to light brown with streaks of pale black. Ash flooring presents a distinctive straight-grain pattern that adds to its visual appeal.

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Walnut

Walnut wood is another popular choice for luxury flooring, revered for its deep, rich brown tones and sophisticated grain patterns. This type of wood exudes a warm and inviting vibe that can make any space feel more like home.

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Bamboo

Bamboo flooring, although technically derived from grass and not a tree, has gained popularity in the luxury wood flooring market. Bamboo is known for its sustainability and strength, and it provides an interesting twist on traditional wood flooring.

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How Much Does Luxury Wood Flooring Cost?

The price of luxury wood flooring can vary depending on the type of wood, the finish, the thickness of the planks, and the specific brand or manufacturer you choose. As a ballpark figure, you can expect to pay anywhere between £30 to £100 per square metre for the luxury wood flooring alone.

Lower-cost luxury woods, like certain types of engineered hardwood or bamboo, may fall at the lower end of this price range. On the other hand, exotic hardwoods or intricate parquet designs can easily reach the higher end. Keep in mind that these costs are exclusive of installation, which can add another £15 to £30 per square metre.

How Do You Maintain Luxury Wood Flooring?

Maintaining wood flooring isn’t as daunting as people think. Here are some simple yet effective ways to keep your floor in pristine condition:

  1. Prompt Spill Cleanup: Accidents happen, but when they do, be sure to clean up spills immediately. Liquid can seep into the wood and cause staining or warping, especially if left unattended.
  2. Avoid Harsh Cleaners: Not all cleaners are wood-friendly. Avoid any cleaning products that are acidic or contain ammonia as they can degrade your floor's finish over time. Instead, look for pH-neutral, wood-friendly cleaning products.
  3. Use Furniture Pads: Furniture can leave scratches and dents on your wood floors. To prevent this, use felt or rubber pads under the legs of your furniture.
  4. Regular Refinishing: Depending on the type of wood flooring you have and the amount of foot traffic it sees, you may need to refinish your floor every few years.

While these general tips can help maintain the elegance of your luxury wood floor, always consider the manufacturer's specific care and maintenance guidelines to keep your floor at its best.

Cleaning

Cleaning is the first line of defence when it comes to maintaining your luxury wood flooring. Here are some key steps to follow:

  1. Routine Sweeping: Sweeping your floor daily with a soft-bristled broom can help remove dirt, dust, and other debris that can scratch the floor surface over time.
  2. Mopping: Use a slightly damp mop to clean your flooring every week. Remember, water is wood's enemy, so avoid soaking the mop. An easy trick is to spray your mop with a wood-friendly cleaner rather than dousing it in water.
  3. Polishing: Consider polishing your floor every few months. This helps to replenish the floor's finish, bringing out the wood's natural beauty and lustre.
  4. Dry Immediately: After cleaning, make sure to dry your floors immediately. Excess moisture left on wood floors can lead to damage and staining.

Repair

Over the years, even the highest quality luxury wood flooring may show signs of wear. However, here are some ways you can repair your flooring:

  1. Scratches: For small scratches, you can use a touch-up pen or filler stick that matches your floor's finish.
  2. Gouges or Dents: Larger damages like gouges or dents may require a bit more effort. You could fill them with wood filler, or you may need to replace the individual board.
  3. Discolouration: Areas of your floor that are exposed to sunlight can discolour over time. To combat this, you can move rugs and furniture around occasionally to ensure the colour fades evenly.
Luxury Wood Flooring Types. Discover the beauty and durability of luxury wood flooring types including parquet, hardwood, engineered, ash, walnut, bamboo, and alternatives.

What Is the Difference Between Luxury Wood Flooring and Budget Wood Flooring?

When comparing luxury wood flooring with budget options, several key differences arise:

What Are Some Alternatives to Luxury Wood Flooring?

While luxury wood flooring offers a myriad of benefits, it may not be for everyone due to factors like cost and maintenance. If you're looking for alternatives that can still provide a warm and elegant aesthetic, consider the following options:

Remember, each flooring type comes with its pros and cons. It's important to consider factors such as the room's usage, your budget, and the overall aesthetics you want to achieve before making a decision.

To Wrap Up

Investing in luxury wood flooring can deliver unmatched elegance and sophistication to your home. Its diverse range, from timeless hardwood to intricate parquet, offers something exclusive for everyone's aesthetic taste. However, just as with any major investment, it's essential to consider all aspects — cost, maintenance, and potential alternatives.
If you’re ready to give your home the luxury makeover it deserves with some stunning wood flooring, don't wait! Get in touch with our expert team at The Ultimate Flooring today. We're here to assist you in exploring the perfect luxury wood flooring options tailored to your home's needs!

If you're a homeowner or business owner with a penchant for the natural, timeless appeal of wood flooring, the subject of maintaining it might interest you. In this guide, we will delve into maintaining wood flooring to keep the shine and longevity of your wood floors, ensuring they remain a worthwhile investment for years to come.

We'll explore the simplicity or complexity of maintaining wood flooring, the differing maintenance requirements based on the type, cleaning methods, suitable cleaners, recommended treatments, and the role of repairs in upkeep. We will also provide an idea of the costs involved. 

Is Wood Flooring Easy To Maintain?

Yes, maintaining wood flooring is typically straightforward when equipped with the proper knowledge and tools. However, it's important to remember that the ease of maintenance can significantly depend on the type of wood flooring installed in your home or office.

Do Different Types of Wood Flooring Require Different Maintenance?

Yes, different types of wood flooring require specific care and maintenance routines. Understanding the unique needs of each flooring type can extend its lifespan and maintain its aesthetic appeal. 

We will examine the different types of wood flooring below:

Solid Wood Flooring

Solid wood flooring is a true classic, comprising single timber cut into planks. This type of flooring is admired for its longevity and ability to be refinished multiple times.

Engineered Wood Flooring 

Engineered wood flooring is a popular choice, known for its layering structure. It consists of a top layer of real wood supported by less expensive, high-quality ply layers. 

Laminated Wood Flooring

Laminated wood flooring is a cost-effective alternative that simulates the appearance of real wood. It consists of a high-resolution image of wood placed over a core board. 

How Do You Clean Wood Flooring?

Cleaning wood flooring involves a series of steps to keep the floor spotless and in pristine condition. 

The following checklist offers a straightforward guideline for cleaning wood flooring:

☐ Use a soft-bristled broom or vacuum with a soft brush attachment, a microfiber mop, and a soft, dry cloth for wiping.
☐ Use a cleaner specifically designed for wood floors.
☐ Remove small furniture, rugs, or other obstacles from the floor.
☐ Start from one corner, sweeping in the direction of the wood grain.
☐ Dampen your mop with a properly diluted cleaning solution, then mop from one corner of the room, working your way towards the exit.
☐ Immediately after mopping, dry your floor with a soft, dry cloth or towel.
☐ Ensure your mop and cloth are damp, not soaking wet.
☐ After wiping, check for any damp spots and wipe again if necessary.
☐ Regularly sweep and mop your floor, and wipe immediately after mopping.
☐ Harsh chemicals can damage your wood floor. Always use the appropriate tools and cleaning solutions.
Wood Flooring Maintenance Checklist

Let's delve into each step and discover how to execute them effectively.

Sweep

Sweeping is an important initial step in maintaining your wood floors. It effectively removes dust, dirt, and loose debris that could otherwise scratch your flooring. While sweeping wooden floors, follow these steps carefully:

Mop

Mopping involves using a damp mop, not a wet one, to clean the flooring. This is done after sweeping to avoid scratches. Here is how to mop your wooden floors effectively and safely:

Wipe

Wiping is the final step in cleaning wooden flooring. It involves drying the floor after mopping to ensure no water is left on the wood surface, as leftover water can damage wood flooring over time. Follow these steps to dry your wooden floors properly:

What Cleaners To Use In Maintaining Wood Flooring?

Selecting the right cleaner is crucial in maintaining the beauty and extending the life span of wood flooring. These are the various cleaners you can use for your wooden floors:

1. Specialised Wood Floor Cleaners: These are cleaners formulated specifically for wood floors. They are gentle yet effective at removing dirt and grime without damaging the wood or leaving a residue. When choosing a wood floor cleaner, ensure it suits your type of wood flooring.

2. pH-Neutral Soap: Mild, pH-neutral soaps mixed with warm water can be a safe and effective cleaner for sealed wood floors. Avoid using acidic or alkaline cleaners, as they can dull or damage the finish.

3. White Vinegar and Water: A solution of half a cup of white vinegar to a gallon of lukewarm water is a popular homemade cleaner. However, it should be used sparingly, as overuse of vinegar can dull the finish over time.

4. Special Care for Oil Floors: If your wood floor has an oiled finish, using a soap designed explicitly for oiled wood floors can help preserve the oil finish and enhance the wood's natural beauty.

5. Avoid Steam Cleaners and Wet Mops: Steam cleaners and wet mops should never be used on wooden floors as they can damage the finish and warp the wood.

Wood Floor Cleaners

Wood Floor Cleaners are specifically formulated cleaning products designed to clean wood floors safely and effectively. They come in various types, including sprays, concentrates, and ready-to-use formulas.

The pros and cons of using these cleaners include:

Pros:

Cons:

Wood flooring care and maintenance tips for solid, engineered, and laminated wood floors. Best treatments and cleaners for wood floor care.

What Are The Best Treatments For Maintaining Wood Flooring?

Wood flooring treatments vary based on the type of wood flooring and specific needs. A few popular treatments include:

Each of these treatments carries its unique set of advantages and drawbacks.

TreatmentProsCons
Regular Sweeping and MoppingPrevents build-up of dust and dirt. Easy to do and cost-effective. Extends the life of the floor.Can miss some embedded dirt and grime. Sweeping can cause scratches if not done with a soft-bristled broom.
Specialised Wood Floor CleanersFormulated specifically for wood floors. Safely clean without damaging the finish.Some may contain chemicals that some people prefer to avoid.
Periodic Professional Deep CleaningThorough cleaning that can remove embedded dirt and grime. Can reach hard-to-clean areas.Can be costly. May require scheduling and availability.
Applying Suitable Wood Floor FinishesProtects the flooring and enhances its appearance. Can help resist scratches and stains.Requires expertise to apply properly. Some finishes may emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
Timely Repairs and RefinishingPrevents further damage and maintains the integrity and appearance of the flooring. Can fix scratches, dents, and stains.Can be expensive depending on the extent of the repair. Requires expertise to perform properly.

How Does Repairing Wooden Flooring Help In Maintaining Wood Flooring?

Repairing wood flooring is a crucial aspect of its maintenance. It restores the floor's aesthetic appeal and extends its lifespan. Small repairs, such as fixing minor scratches, and large ones, like board replacement, can prevent further damage and maintain the integrity of the flooring. 

How Do You Refinish Wood Flooring?

Refinishing wood flooring involves removing the existing floor finish, sanding the surface to smooth out any scratches or discolourations, and then applying a new finish. This process rejuvenates your wood flooring, allowing it to regain its original lustre and charm.

These steps should help you get started: 

1. Clear the Room: Remove all furniture, rugs, and other items from the room.

2. Clean the Floor: Thoroughly clean the floor to remove dust and debris. Ensure the floor is completely dry before moving to the next step.

3. Sand the Floor: Use a sander to remove the old finish and smooth any scratches or discolourations. Start with coarse-grit sandpaper and move to finer grits for a smooth finish.

4. Clean Again: Vacuum or wipe away the dust created by sanding. This vital step ensures dust doesn't get trapped beneath the new finish.

5. Apply the Stain (Optional): If you wish to change the colour of your floor, apply a wood stain evenly, following the direction of the wood grain. Allow it to dry completely.

6. Apply the Finish: Using a brush or roller, apply a thin layer of wood finish, again following the direction of the grain. Allow it to dry according to the manufacturer's instructions.

7. Add Additional Coats (If necessary): Depending on the type of finish used and the desired look, you may need to apply additional coats. Always ensure the previous coat is completely dry before adding another.

8. Let the Floor Cure: Let the finished floor cure for a few days before moving furniture back into the room.

This process can be quite labour-intensive and requires expertise, so many people hire professionals to refinish their wood floors.

What Is The Cost Of Maintaining Wood Flooring?

The cost of maintaining wood flooring can fluctuate based on the type of wood, the space size, and the specific maintenance tasks being conducted. Here are some average costs in the UK:

These approximate costs can vary based on various factors, including your geographical location and the specific condition of your flooring. 

Conclusion

Maintaining your wood flooring need not be a daunting task. With the knowledge you've gained from this guide, you should now be equipped to effectively handle the care and maintenance of your wood flooring. 

But remember, the key to the longevity of your wood flooring lies in regular maintenance and prompt repairs. Ensure that you treat your flooring with the care it deserves, and it will reward you with enduring beauty and durability. 
Do you need professional help in maintaining your wood flooring? Don't hesitate to contact us at The Ultimate Flooring, your trusted partner in all things relating to wood flooring.

With its rich patina and timeless elegance, wood flooring never goes out of style. It can elevate any décor and add a lot of character and value to your home with its natural warmth and classic beauty. 

Wood flooring is sturdy and long-lasting if maintained properly, lasting up to 100 years or more. And even though it can be scratched, the scratches can add a touch of antique charm, especially as the wood ages. 

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll discuss everything you need to know about the wood flooring installation process, from its main steps to whether or not it’s DIY-friendly.

1. Choosing Your Flooring

First order of business, you need to choose the right type of wood flooring for your project. There are several factors to consider here as indicated below. 

  1. Type of Wood

Solid hardwood, engineered wood, and laminate floors each have their pros and cons. Solid hardwood is the way to go for maximum longevity, whereas engineered wood is perfect for dimensional stability, especially with radiant heat or concrete subfloor installations. If you’re on a tight budget, laminate floors are a good option. 

  1. Width of Floorboards

Deciding on the width of the floorboards will boil down to aesthetic preferences. Wide-plank floors, around 125mm to 200mm, offer a dramatic and rustic look, but they’re more costly than traditional floors (70mm to 100mm).

  1. Quality Grade

Higher grades of wood have a uniform, almost flawless appearance but come with a high price tag. Lower grades tend to have knots and visible character marks. Choose the grade that suits your budget and desired look. 

  1. Colour and Finish

Do you want your flooring to be light (e.g., natural oak) or dark (e.g., walnut)? Also, do you want a glossy finish that offers shine and depth or a matte/satin finish with a more subtle lustre? 

Along with the above-listed factors, which relate mainly to the characteristics of wood, there are non-wood-related factors that should influence your choice of flooring, namely: 

Living rooms and bedrooms allow more flexibility in flooring choices compared to high-moisture areas like bathrooms and kitchens. Solid hardwood and engineered wood are suitable for most rooms, while LVT and laminate are suited for kitchens and bathrooms. 

For smaller rooms, we highly recommend going with wide-plank floors. Narrow-plank floors can make small rooms feel cramped, while wide planks will make them look more commodious. 

Wide-plank, matte-finish floors are best suited for contemporary spaces. For traditional homes, glossy-finish classic oak, maple, or cherry floors are a good fit. For more rustic styles, opt for distressed or hand-scraped wood. 

Houses with kids or pets may warrant more scratch-resistant wood finishes. As for houses in humid climates, they should opt for wood varieties that offer high dimensional stability, like red oak and ash. 

The amount of natural and artificial lighting can affect how a wood floor looks. For example, darker stains typically show more detail in bright light. 

2. Measuring Up

The next step in a typical wood flooring installation involves taking measurements to calculate how much flooring you need and a rough estimate of the cost. 

  1. Calculate the Square Meterage 

Using a tape measure or a laser distance measurer, measure the length and width of each room you’re looking to refloor. We recommend taking measurements in multiple spots as most rooms aren’t perfectly rectangular. You then multiply the average length by the average width to get the square meterage. 

Example: If the room's length is 6m and the width is 4m, the square meterage would be 24m². For irregular rooms, check out this video tutorial

  1. Account for Cutting Waste

The figure you calculated in the previous step isn’t the final figure. You still need to account for cutting waste and defects. To do so, add 5-10% to the square meterage. If you’re working with parquets as opposed to planks, you should add 12-15%. 

  1. Figure Out Flooring Direction

Perpendicular flooring draws the eye from side to side across a room. This has the effect of making a room appear larger. Parallel flooring draws the eye ahead in the direction of entryways or windows. It helps add depth to smaller spaces. The latter is the more traditional choice for most installations. 

To figure out how much flooring you need, calculate the square meterage, add the 5-15% cutting waste factor, and then multiply the result by the width of the flooring board to get a linear value. 

Here’s an example:

  1. Room is 5 metres in length and 4 metres in width = 20 square metres.
  2. 10% cutting waste factor = 2 additional square metres.
  3. Total adjusted square meterage is 22 square metres.
  4. Assume the flooring boards are 20cm wide = 0.2m.
  5. Multiply total square meterage (22) by board width (0.2) = 4.4 linear metres. 

So, to cover a room that measures 20 square metres using 20cm-wide boards with a 10% waste factor, you would need to purchase approximately 4.4 linear metres of flooring. 

To calculate the cost of your purchase, simply multiply the number of linear metres by the price per linear metre. If the price per linear metre is £50, for instance, you would spend £220 for 4.4 linear metres. 

Note: If the flooring is sold by the square metre, simply multiply the total adjusted square meterage—22 square metres in the example above—by the cost per square metre. 

3. Selecting Tools

Now that you’ve purchased enough flooring material for your project, it’s time to gather the tools necessary for the installation. Some of the tools listed below will already be in your toolbox.

  1. Tape Measure

You should already have a tape measure if you’ve carried out the previous step. You use it, along with a carpenter's square and some chalk, to measure and mark straight lines during the installation. 

  1. Dust Mask

When using power tools on wood, dust particles are going to fly everywhere. You definitely wouldn’t want to inhale that dust, so be sure to have a dust mask handy. Ear protection is also recommended. 

  1. Table/Miter Saw

You’ll need a table saw or mitre saw to cut wood planks to size and mitre their edges. We’d recommend getting a sliding mitre saw for wide cross-cuts. 

  1. Jamb Saw

This is a specialised hand saw that’s used to undercut door jambs so that flooring can fit underneath them. This isn’t necessary, but it makes for a clean finish. 

  1. Flooring Nailer/Stapler

You’ll need a nailer or stapler to secure tongue-and-groove hardwood planks to the subfloor. Make sure to purchase nails/staples that are compatible with your flooring thickness. 

  1. Rubber Mallet

This is a soft hammer that you’ll use to tap the flooring together. Avoid using a hammer that has a metal head to prevent dents and damage. 

  1. Tapping Block and Pull Bar

You’ll use these tools with the rubber mallet to tap the wooden planks tightly together and pull them into place while avoiding damage. 

  1. Power Drill/Driver

You’ll use the power drill/drive to screw the flooring planks to the subfloor. We recommend having a selection of drill bits on hand for a smooth installation. 

  1. Moisture Metre

You’ll use this metre to test the moisture content of the subfloor and wooden planks before installation. Wagner and Lingomat are popular brand names to consider. 

  1. Pry Bar

Useful for removing existing floorboards and mouldings. We recommend getting one with a flattened end for easier floorboard/moulding removal.  

  1. Utility Knife

While not an essential tool, you may need it for trimming excess flooring and underlayment. Make sure to use fresh blades for clean cuts. 

  1. Wood Flooring Cleaner

Lastly, you’ll need a flooring cleaner to clean the finished floors after you’re done with the installation. Two of our favourite hardwood floor cleaner brands are Bona and Bruce. 

4. Subfloor Preparation

The subfloor is a building’s foundational floor. It’s typically made up of plywood or concrete. Subfloor preparation, as the name suggests, is the process of getting the subfloor ready for the new flooring materials (i.e., wood). 

There are several ways to prepare your subfloor for wood flooring, from making sure it’s level and in good condition to ensuring it’s clean and dry. 

A typical subfloor preparation involves ensuring that the subfloor is:

  1. Flat and level, using a straight edge or a spirit level. 
  2. Dry, using a moisture metre. 
  3. Clean, by sweeping and removing surface dirt, chemicals, and adhesives. 

5. Underlay or Glue

Underlayment is a material that’s installed between the subfloor and wood flooring to provide moisture protection and sound absorption. Glue or adhesives, on the other hand, are used to bond the wood flooring boards directly to the subfloor. 

If you’re having a hard time choosing between the two, consider their pros and cons:

MethodProsCons
Underlayment– Cushioning and isolation- Noise and echo reduction- Allows for floating floor installation– More expensive than adhesives- May also require adhesive for stability- Slightly increases floor height 
Adhesion– Strong bond to subflooring- Direct glue-down installation- No need for underlayment– Messy application process- Fumes require ventilation- The floors cannot be floated

Both application methods ensure a smooth and stable finished floor. Choosing between them will boil down to the specific type of flooring being installed and personal preference. 

Go for underlayment if you’re looking to create a buffer layer between the wood flooring and the subflooring. But if you’re looking for a direct attachment method, adhesion is your best bet. 

6. Laying Wood Flooring

After you’ve prepared your subflooring, settled on an application method, and determined the optimal direction for the flooring boards based on the size and shape of the space, it’s time to lay the wood flooring.

Here are the steps you need to follow:

  1. Remove Baseboards and Trim

You first need to pry off existing baseboards, door trim, and thresholds using the pry bar. Be careful not to damage the trim pieces as you’ll reinstall them later. Also, be sure not to damage the walls. 

  1. Lay the Starter Row

From a corner, start laying the first row of boards against the straightest wall in the room, with spacers placed against the walls to allow for expansion gaps. Make sure this starter row is as straight as possible, as this will affect the rest of the installation. 

  1. Stagger the End Joints

The end seams between the boards of each consecutive row should be staggered by at least 150 to 300mm. This ensures stability and prevents aligned seams, which could crack over time. 

  1. Use Fasteners

As you lay each board, use a stapler or nail gun to place fasteners every 100 to 150mm along the boards. You can also use temporary fixing cleats. 

  1. Secret Nail at the Tongue

Secret nailing is a technique where you nail through the tongue of the floorboard at an angle so that the nail heads are concealed once the adjoining board is installed. 

  1. Knock the Boards Into Place

Using the tapping block, gently knock the boards into place. Once again, you don’t want to use a hammer in this step as it can damage the surface of the boards. 

  1. Cut Final Row

Measure and cut the final row of boards to fit snugly against the wall while accounting for the spacer gaps. You may need to use the pry bar to manoeuvre into place. 

  1. Reinstall the Trim

Once you’re done with the steps above, simply renail all skirting boards, thresholds, and door trim to cover the expansion gaps along the walls and doors. 

7. Finishing Wooden Flooring

Finishing is the process of sanding, staining, and applying protective sealant to the wood flooring. If the flooring you bought is already sanded and stained, you’ll only need to apply a sealant. 

Here’s what this process entails:

  1. Sand the Flooring

Use a coarse to fine sandpaper to smoothen the surface of the flooring. You’ll need to vacuum after each sanding to keep the place free of wood particles. 

  1. Apply Stain

If desired, you can use water or oil-based stains to achieve the specific look you want. We recommend testing on samples first. We also recommend applying the stain along with, not against, the wood grain. 

  1. Seal the Floor

Next, you need to seal the floor so that moisture doesn’t seep in between the boards. You can use water-based polyurethane or moisture-cured urethane (for humid environments). 

  1. Apply Wax Finish

This step is optional, but waxing helps give you a classic, low-sheen look that’s quite appealing. We recommend it for low-traffic areas. 

Comprehensive wood flooring installation process in the UK - measuring, floor prep, tools, cost, maintenance. DIY guide for a perfect wooden floor transformation.

8. Maintaining Wood Flooring

Proper maintenance keeps your wooden floor in good condition and extends its beauty. Here are some tips on how to maintain your wooden floor after installation:

  1. Regular Sweeping and Vacuuming

Use a soft-bristle broom to sweep your wood flooring regularly. Also, use a hardwood-safe vacuum to get rid of dirt and debris that can scratch the wood. 

  1. Cleaning Spills Promptly

Any liquid spills should be wiped up as quickly as possible. If you let it linger long enough, it will stain and warp the wood. 

  1. Damp Mopping

If you’re used to mopping your floor every so often, you’ll want to tone it down a bit. And when it’s time to mop, be sure to use a damp, not wet, mop to avoid soaking the floors.

  1. Controlling Humidity

You can probably see the pattern here; water and wood flooring don’t mix! So you’ll want to keep the humidity level in your house between 40% and 60% to minimise expansion and contraction. 

  1. Using Felt Pads for Furniture

Attach felt pads to chair and table legs to prevent them from scratching and denting your hardwood floor. 

  1. Limiting Direct Sunlight

UV light can damage your wooden floor and cause it to fade. So be sure to use curtains, shades, or rugs to limit direct sunlight exposure. 

Please bear in mind that different types of wood flooring require different levels of maintenance. For instance, exotic wood that’s imported from tropical regions often requires more careful maintenance than domestic hardwoods. 

Generally speaking, darker, smoother wood floors show wear and tear more readily than lighter, wire-brushed floors. So the darker and smoother your floor, the more maintenance it’ll need. 

Do Different Styles and Patterns Require a Different Installation Process?

Yes, different flooring styles and patterns do require a slightly different installation process. For instance:

  1. Solid Hardwood

Basic installation; often nailed or stapled to the subfloor. It comes in simple patterns like parallel boards or squares. 

  1. Engineered Wood

Can accommodate more intricate design patterns like herringbone due to its dimensional stability. That said, the boards must be precisely cut and glued to the subfloor rather than nailed. 

  1. Exotic Woods

Brittleness and hardness may limit pattern options in certain exotic wood varieties. They’re often glued down to the subfloor as opposed to nailed or stapled. 

How Much Does It Cost to Install Wood Flooring?

The wood itself is going to cost anywhere from £20 to £100 per square metre, depending on the type of wood you choose. Add another £15 to £30 per square metre for the installation. 

Several factors affect the cost of wood flooring installation. Different patterns and finishes can be more expensive than others. You also have to account for factors like board width and wood grade. 

Here’s a brief explanation:

  1. Wood Species

Different wood species come at different prices as a result of their varying availability and durability. As an example, pine costs considerably less than walnut because it’s not as resistant to damage. 

  1. Pattern/Design

Certain patterns and designs are more intricate and elaborate than others, requiring more skill and time from your contractor to install. 

  1. Finish

Traditional finishes like oil and wax are more affordable than more modern finishes like lacquer and varnish.

  1. Board Width

Narrow plank widths (70mm to 100mm) often cost less than wider planks (125mm to 200mm). 

  1. Wood Grade

The higher the wood grade, as in the fewer knots and defects it has, the more it costs. 

How Long Does It Take to Install Wood Flooring?

Wood flooring installation for an average-sized room takes 2-5 days. If you’re flooring an entire house, the process can take 1-2 weeks. 

The time it takes to complete a wood flooring installation varies based on a range of factors, the biggest of which is room size. Flooring larger rooms or multiple rooms will need more total labour hours to complete. 

Other factors that affect installation time include:

Do You Need to Hire a Professional for Wood Flooring Installation?

No, you don’t need to hire a professional for wood flooring installation. However, unless you have experience with flooring projects, hiring a professional would be advisable. 

Pros of hiring a professional:

Cons of hiring a professional:

Can You Fit Wood Flooring Yourself?

You can, but unless you have enough DIY flooring experience, we wouldn’t recommend it. It’s a difficult project that requires a great deal of experience. 

Pros of DIY wood flooring:

Cons of DIY wood flooring:

Can You Install Wood Flooring Over Your Existing Flooring?

Yes, but it depends on the type of existing flooring you have. You can install wood over concrete, tile, sheet vinyl, OSB, and plywood. You shouldn’t install it over carpet, cushioned vinyl, or floating floors. 

Does Wood Flooring Need Acclimation Before Installation?

Yes, wood needs to acclimate for 3-5 days in the room in which it will be installed. This is to allow the boards to adjust the room’s temperature and humidity. 

What Are Some Common Problems When Laying Wood Flooring?

Some of the most common problems when laying wood flooring include:

What Is the Process for Installing Laminate Flooring?

Here are the steps to installing laminate flooring:

  1. Make sure the subfloor is clean and level
  2. Cut the planks to fit room size
  3. Lay foam underlayment
  4. Leave an expansion gap of around 10-15mm
  5. Stagger the end joints of the planks
  6. Lock the planks together on their ends and sides
  7. Use spacer wedges for proper alignment
  8. Seal the seams (you can use silicone caulk)

What Is the Process of Installing Vinyl Flooring?

Here are the steps to installing vinyl flooring:

  1. Clean and level the subfloor
  2. Cut the planks to fit room size
  3. Lay a thin foam underlayment
  4. Place the planks with the tongue side facing the wall
  5. Lock the planks together on their ends and sides
  6. Heat the seams using a heat gun
  7. Install trim moulding over the edges

Wrap-Up

Wood flooring adds a timeless and natural beauty to any space. It’s versatile, durable, and easy to maintain, not to mention that it increases your property’s value!

While it’s possible to DIY a wood flooring project, it’s not recommended. If you don’t have enough experience, you’ll run into a host of problems that will eventually lead to poor results. For professional wood flooring installation in the UK, get in touch with us.

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